18Jun

Movie Review of Ozu’s Attitude on Modernity and Tradition

 

 

 

Movie Review of  Ozu’s Attitude on Modernity and Tradition

Late spring is a Japanese film that may is complex for the grasp of westerners unless the thematic outlook of the film is explored in an in-depth style. The film tells the story of a 56-year-old man living a pleasant lifestyle together with his daughter who is 27 years old. As a way of pressuring the daughter to get married, the father makes up a false marriage plan. The plan worked and compelled her to marry, leading to the conclusion of the story. Despite the simplicity of the film, the events contained in it can be viewed and explored from a variety of viewpoints. In adopting the plan, the father lies to the daughter and makes the sacrifice to live without the daughter, and the daughter lies and pretends that she is eagerly awaiting the father’s marriage. The views expressed in the film can also be seen as the depiction of the traditions of the Japanese society and the values they acted out. The characters in the film demonstrate that Ozu is open to both tradition and modern life, more typically as evident from the experiences of Norika and Shukichi.

Analysis of a Scene in the Film and Ozu’s Attitude on Modernity and Tradition

 
At the vase scene that comes towards the end of the film, during a visit to Kyoto for the final trip before Norika is married, the different views of the two on some topics becomes apparent. After the lengthy visit at the temples, they stopped to rest at the inn. After conversing about the beauty of the day, Noriko started a serious talk, despite that the father does not respond, and instead falls asleep. After the father is shown sleeping, the daughter is shown glancing at him, after which she cut towards the vase. After a few seconds, another shot shows Noriko looking at the ceiling in a thoughtful manner. After a ten-second shot to the vase near a window, Noriko is shown again, but this time she is depicted at the point of being overcome by emotion; she is almost tearing. The scene then ends quietly. The change from the lively mood of talking about the visit they had just completed is likely to show the differences in communication preferences caused by the acceptance of modernity. As an example, it is probable that after talking about the trip, Norika started a conversation contesting the importance of her marriage, and the weight of leaving the father alone. From another viewpoint, the silence of the father is likely the indication of a communication breakdown between the talk that was going on between the two, over the acceptance of modernity or identification with tradition
 
 
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